DCoE Blog

  • What Do You Call a Military Patient?
    Graphic courtesy of Deployment Health Clinical Center

    The chain of command in the military offers structure, denotes a clear line of responsibility and tasks, and maintains overall order. While the rank structure is essential to an effective military, it can be tricky for mental health providers to know how to address their military patients. In addition to rank, service members may go by last names, job titles, nick names, etc. So just what do you call a member of the military?

    This excerpt from a Clinician’s Corner post, written by Navy Capt. (Dr.) Carrie Kennedy, director of the Deployment Health Clinical Center, highlights her perspective on how to address military patients seeking mental health support:

     

  • Experts Discuss How Brain Injury Affects Communication Skills
    U.S. Navy photo by Jason Bortz

    How a service member communicates with others can change after a traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    “People with TBI speak better than they communicate,” said Linda Picon, Department of Veterans Affairs senior consultant and liaison for TBI at the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Picon and Inbal Eshel, Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center senior principal scientist, are a duo with more than 35 years of experience studying and treating TBI patients. They shared with us how TBI can cause communication disorders.

  • How to Support Women Who Serve, Their Mental Health: Tips for Providers
    Female soldier crawling under barbed wire.
    U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Aaron Ellerma

    Women represent about 16 percent of our active-duty military force. As they continue to serve, it’s critical that clinicians are equipped to treat their psychological health concerns.

    Deputy Director Dr. Kate McGraw of the Deployment Health Clinical Center has spent more than three decades working for the military. Much of her work has been dedicated to the psychological differences and needs of women in the military.

  • 10 Mental Health Blogs You Don’t Want to Miss
    U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Chad Strohmeyer

    The Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) strives to provide the most up-to-date information and resources on research, tools and services available for the military community. DCoE, including its centers and campaigns, produces blog posts to help make the information available to everyone, and easier to understand.

  • How to Walk Away from Tobacco
    Image  of used cigarettes.
    U.S. Army photo by Rachel Larue

    Quitting tobacco is hard. In fact, it’s common for people to relapse several times before kicking the habit completely. Whether your preference is lighting a cigarette or using a smokeless variety, tobacco can be difficult to part with.

    As bad habits go, smoking is pretty common: More than 15 percent of Americans use cigarettes.

    Quitting can have huge benefits for your health. Those who stop smoking experience lower blood pressure, reduce coughing and phlegm, and decrease their risk of cancer and heart disease.

  • Psychological Health Center Highlights How Commanders Can Help Service Member Wellness
    Marine in combat year talking on radio.
    U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Andrew Huff

    There are many factors that impact service members’ overall well-being. Like many things in life, it often takes a team approach when there are obstacles. Service members benefit when mental health providers and commanders communicate effectively. For example, commanders can help improve the environment for soldiers’ wellness.

    The Deployment Health Clinical Center discusses how providers can build rapport with a patient’s command, adhere to command disclosure policies and make decisive recommendations.

     

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