DCoE Blog

  • DVBIC Podcast Looks at Substance Use after TBI

    Read the full story: DVBIC Podcast Looks at Substance Use after TBI
    Photo courtesy of II Marine Expeditionary Force

    Army Capt. Daniel Hines knew something was wrong with his friend. Normally a model soldier and enthusiastic recruiter for the Army, the friend was now complaining of burnout, acting irritable and getting into bar fights.

    “If there hadn’t been an intervention, I believe he would have just spiraled out of control,” Hines said. “He would have been arrested; he would have ruined that stellar career he had.”

    Hines’ friend had a traumatic brain injury (TBI) following several blast exposures. He began struggling with TBI and substance abuse. This dangerous combination was the focus of a recent episode of The TBI Family, a podcast series by the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC).

  • Military Sexual Assault Affects Everyone

    Read the full story: Military Sexual Assault Affects Everyone

    Sexual assault affects all service members within the Defense Department, regardless of their gender.

    The Deployment Health Clinical Center recently published an article about the sexual assault of male service members – a group of survivors often overlooked.

    Sexual Assault Awareness Month is a time to talk openly about a topic that we should all be concerned about: sexual assault and harassment of U.S. military members. Sexual assault not only devastates the individual who is harmed, but it also hurts the morale of the unit and of everyone involved, and critically impairs the mission of the Department of Defense (DoD).

  • Learn to Recognize, Control Post-Deployment Anger

    Read the full story: Learn to Recognize, Control Post-Deployment Anger
    U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Zachary Wolf

    Feeling anger is a normal part of your emotional spectrum. Service members may find that anger is a useful emotion during combat. However, once they return home, that anger — and the experiences that come with it — can cause problems. A recent webinar hosted by the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury addressed these problems and potential solutions.

    Signs of Anger

    Anger can range in intensity from irritation to rage and can be helpful or harmful, depending on the situation. The body reacts to anger with increased adrenaline, alertness, heart rate and blood pressure. Certain physical reactions (a clenched jaw, muscle tension, shakiness, restlessness, agitation, etc.) can help signal feelings of anger, even if you are not aware of those feelings. Over time excessive anger can cause long-term health issues.

  • DVBIC Podcast Provides Help for Family Caregivers

    Read the full story: DVBIC Podcast Provides Help for Family Caregivers

    In a small brick house in northern Baltimore, Joann Anderson-West cares for two injured Army veterans whose families are unable to provide care. One of the veterans, Ralph Stepney, was placed with Anderson-West after he reached out to the Department of Veterans Affairs for help.

    “She's family,” Stepney said, “because she treats me like family. She's a very excellent cook. She has a beautiful home, and I'm very, very comfortable here and I enjoy life again.”

    Anderson-West’s story is one of many told by the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC) in its ongoing podcast series, “The TBI Family.” Her story is part of an episode that discusses foster care and cognitive rehabilitation for those with a traumatic brain injury (TBI).

  • Celebrating Milestones through 25 Years of DVBIC

    Read the full story: Celebrating Milestones through 25 Years of DVBIC

    This year marks 25 years since a congressional mandate created the Defense and Veterans Head Injury Program in response to the first Gulf War and the need to treat service members with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Service members and veterans impacted by TBI rely on the program, known today as the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC), to propel TBI clinical care, groundbreaking research and innovative education.

    Over its 25 years, DVBIC has reached a number of pivotal milestones in the advancement of TBI care that continue to impact prevention and treatment today.

  • A Head for the Future Empowers Service Members to Prevent TBI

    Read the full story: A Head for the Future Empowers Service Members to Prevent TBI
    Photo courtesy of A Head for the Future

    Service members face the risk of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on a daily basis. Just as precautions are useful in a combat zone to protect your head, you also need to take measures in your everyday life to stay safe. A Head for the Future created a video to illustrate good practices in TBI prevention.

    Many people think of traumatic brain injury (TBI) as a combat risk. However, most service members experience TBIs in non-deployed settings. That’s why the A Head for the Future “Power to Prevent” public service announcement video focuses on how to stay safe in everyday situations. 

    The video, shot from the perspective of a service member, features a variety of everyday activities: cycling, playing sports, riding a motorcycle and just hanging out with friends. Each of these activities can result in a bump or jolt to the head — and potential TBI.

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